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Easy Guide for Writing a Pi Poem

February 28, 2018

 

Easy Guide for Writing a Pi Poem for Spring

 

On this eve of meteorological spring–March 1, 2018–I am sharing with you another pi poem.  Of all the pieces which I have posted since January 19, 2013, my blog posts about pi poems are at the top of the list for the most views on my WORDWALK blogsite.  Thus, to help some students and other hobby writers, I am including an easy guide for writing a pi poem of 32 lines, along with a sample pi poem; however, by following the numerals of the mathematical pi, you may write your pi poem of lesser or more poetic lines.  You need only count the syllables per line to coincide with the numerals of the mathematical pi (as noted below).  The rhyme scheme, or lack thereof, is totally your choice.  Nevertheless, be certain to add as many poetic touches as are appropriate for your creation.

 

I am giving you the following sample of a pi poem and then the guide for writing a “piem” so that you will have two weeks to craft a pi poem by “Pi Day”–March 14 (3/14).  While you may choose any topic for the focus of your pi poem, I selected “Primavera” (Spanish and Italian for “spring”) for the topic of my sample of a pi poem.  Try your poetic hand at being a “piemist” after you have read the pi poem and then the poem again with the syllabic guide.

 

Welcome, Primavera:  A Seasoned Pi Poem

 

by Alice Jane-Marie Massa

 

 

Spring blessings

come

upon the heel

of

winter’s frosted clouds,

on ochre petals of daffodils,

on trills

of robins’ measured notes,

in hyacinth air,

from sweet voices

of children swinging,

from the soft whir of bicycles,

from fragrance of earth where I will plant

perennial Summer Soul

To hear the quiet affirmation–

dear Nature’s

welcome:

“Primavera,

alas, your turn has come to choose.

How will our March,

April, and May appear?

Whisper

meteorological,

precious secrets

to planters,

gardeners,

tillers of your magical soil.

Bless their fields,

gardens

with fair rationings of rain,

lightning, tempered wind, prodigious sun.

Primavera, come!”

 

NOTE:  Below you will find my pi poem with each of the 32 lines preceded by the number of syllables in the line.  These numbers, in order down the left column, comprise the first 32 numerals of the mathematical pi.

 

Welcome, Primavera:  A Seasoned Pi Poem

 

(3)  Spring blessings

(1)  come

(4)  upon the heel

(1)  of

(5)  winter’s frosted clouds,

(9)  on ochre petals of daffodils,

(2)  on trills

(6)  of robins’ measured notes,

(5)  in hyacinth air,

(3)  from sweet voices

(5)  of children swinging,

(8)  from the soft whir of bicycles,

(9)  from fragrance of earth where I will plant

(7)  perennial Summer Soul

(9)  To hear the quiet affirmation–

(3)  dear Nature’s

(2)  welcome:

(3)  “Primavera,

(8)  alas, your turn has come to choose.

(4)  How will our March,

(6)  April, and May appear?

(2)  Whisper

(6)  meteorological,

(4)  precious secrets

(3)  to planters,

(3)  gardeners,

(8)  tillers of your magical soil.

(3)  Bless their fields,

(2)  gardens

(7)  with fair rationings of rain,

(9)lightning, tempered wind, prodigious sun.

(5)  Primavera, come!”

 

Happy writing, and enjoy meteorological spring!

Alice and Leader Dog Willow

 

February 28, 2018, Wednesday

 

 

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7 Comments
  1. Sue McKendry permalink

    Thanks, Alice, for this piem which includes not only the lesson, but the very first welcome to spring 2018 that I’ve read. I can almost smell those hyacinth blossoms!–Sue

    • Hi, Sue–I hope you will have some fragrant hyacinths soon.  With Tuesday’s 60-degree high temperature, I caught a bad case of “spring fever.”  Although the spring fever should have been the 24-hour variety, my spring fever persists.

      Thanks so much for your comment–Alice and Willow

  2. Thanks for the idea, Alice. I might give this a try.

    • Hi, Abbie–You are welcome.  The pi poem is an easier form to follow than many other poetic forms.  I will look forward to reading a piem by you.

      Thanks for your comment and the “like” which you gave this post–Alice and Willow

  3. Thank you, Alice, for this delightful pi poem, which made me even more ready for spring! In my preschool classroom the winter bulletin boards are coming down to be replaced by colorful kites and pastel watercolor art. Here in Arvada, we will certainly have windy March days and at least one big April snowstorm to cover the blooming daffodils. We will also look forward to many lovely spring days for our outdoor enjoyment!
    Best wishes for a Happy Primavera to you and Willow!
    Love, Mary

    • Mary–Yes, I am sure that your little students will enjoy the spring decor and learning activities of your classroom.  Remember to plan an activity for National Poetry Month (April).

      Happy spring to you and your students!

      Alice and Willow

  4. Reblogged this on Abbie's Corner of the World and commented:
    When Alice posted this a couple of weeks ago, I hoped to have time to write a pi poem and post it here today, but as you can see, that didn’t happen, so here’s Alice’s poem with instructions on how to write in this poetic form. If you’re a poet, I triple dog dare you to give this a try. Good luck, and happy Pi Day.

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