Skip to content

A Pi Poem to Treasure Crocheted Afghans

March 8, 2017

 

A Pi Poem to Treasure Crocheted Afghans

 

by Alice Jane-Marie Massa

 

 

Hands that held

small,

plain crochet hooks,

as

if artist’s brushes,

turned strands of yarn into canvases

of warmth,

of love gifted to all

who received afghans

crafted by

Mother, Aunt Zita,

and–of course, the most prolific–

my paternal grandmother (Liza).

 

rippled, shell, or granny square

were patterns they crocheted in colors

to match taste,

decor,

occasion

for the lucky recipient.

 

Covered with warmth

of the wool, granny-square

afghan,

I thought of my mother

who still gives me

her caring,

her wisdom,

her amazing inspiration

for this poem.

 

This week,

my sister sent to the twins

two small afghans made by our mother

so that a brand new

generation can feel the warmth from the past

and learn

to smile, wrapped in hand-crocheted love.

 

NOTE:  In my previous Wordwalk blog, I wrote briefly of how to create a pi poem and also included another pi poem of mine.  While I divided this week’s pi poem into stanzas, you (the poet) decide whether to write the pi poem as one stanza or to divide the “piem” into two or more stanzas.  Below I will repeat the exact same pi poem as above; but I will insert at the onset of each line the number of syllables in that particular line, according to the first thirty-five numerals of the mathematical pi.  As in last week’s poem, I converted the first zero of pi into the number ten; thus, the second-from-the-last line of this post’s piem contains ten syllables.  Please note in the comment section any question about writing a pi poem, and I will be happy to respond.  Now, you have less than a week to craft your pi poem for Pi Day, March 14, 2017 (3/14/17).

 

 

A Pi Poem to Treasure Crocheted Afghans

 

by Alice Jane-Marie Massa

 

 

# First Stanza

 

(3)  Hands that held

(1)  small,

(4)  plain crochet hooks,

(1)  as

(5)  if artist’s brushes,

(9)  turned strands of yarn into canvases

(2)  of warmth,

(6)  of love gifted to all

(5)  who received afghans

(3)  crafted by

(5)  Mother, Aunt Zita,

(8)  and–of course, the most prolific–

(9)  my paternal grandmother (Liza).

 

# Second Stanza

 

(7)  rippled, shell, or granny square

(9)  were patterns they crocheted in colors

(3)  to match taste,

(2)  decor,

(3)  occasion

(8)  for the lucky recipient.

 

# Third Stanza

 

(4)  Covered with warmth

(8)  of the wool granny-square

(2)  afghan,

(6)  I thought of my mother

(4)  who still gives me

(3)  her caring,

(3)  her wisdom,

(8)  her amazing inspiration

(3)  for this poem.

 

# Fourth Stanza

 

(2)  This week,

(7)  my sister sent to the twins

(9)  two small afghans made by our mother

(5) so that a brand new

(10) generation can feel warmth from the past

(2)  and learn

(8)  to smile, wrapped in hand-crocheted love.

 

 

On March 14 (3/14), next Tuesday, please enjoy a piece of PIE and a pi poem!

Alice and Leader Dog Willow

 

March 8, 2017, Wednesday

 

Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

4 Comments
  1. Sue McKendry permalink

    Alice–Enjoyed this poem as I have fond memories of a friend who made me an afghan that is used on the occasional afternoon nap. Now, you have convinced me that reading poetry is enjoyable, but I’m not sure you will hook me on this “pi” business as math is way down on my list. Still, it is an interesting spin on writing, and I can see this technique could be a good way to start someone on the path–Your second example with the numbers was especially helpful–anyway, I’ve learned to never say “never.”–Sue

    • Sue–Thanks for adding your comment about your afghan. Also, I am glad to hear that you are not ruling out a pi poem in your future.

      Take care–Alice and Willow

  2. mfanyo permalink

    Dear Alice,
    Those unique afghans made by our loved ones have a special place in my heart and my home with one of Mother’s shell-stitch afghans on my bed and another in the living room as well as the one Grandma made for my college graduation on another bed and still another on our parents’ bed in the guest room. Each warms the room with love. I hope the new little twin girls in our family will love their afghans and share them with their own children someday.
    With love and appreciation for all your words,
    Mary

    • Mary–Thanks for adding your comment. With the first Indy car race of the season on Sunday, I remember the afghan which Mother made for me and which was all squares of black and white to resemble the checkered flag used to indicate the winner of a car race. This wool afghan’s squares were of a different, more closely crocheted pattern than the granny-square pattern. Now, my nephew and great-nephew have this “winning” afghan.

      Another nice thought about afghans is that you gave one of Mother’s afghans to our little cousin Mia, born last June. Now, one of Mother’s afghans is in another country–Mexico.

      Thankfully, our relatives made an abundance of afghans. Enjoy the weekend–Alice and Willow

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: